VIDEO PRESENTATION FAQ

Presenting your work as a video requires creative talent and moving beyond familiar presentation formats and techniques to communicate your message. At first, it may appear a daunting task, but the benefits will be worth the effort. First, video presentations allow one to express their creative talent, an opportunity that is not always evident in research, and provides a bridge between science and art. Second, they present opportunities for marine mammal research to reach a wider audience through social media and other avenues not accessible with conventional oral or poster presentations and thus useful outreach tools. Third, presentations with footage of marine mammals underwater provide a greater understanding and appreciation of how these remarkable animals live in the marine environment and may contribute toward developing new research ideas. 

Watch this video for guidelines, advice and encouragement on how to present your research as a video.

 

Guidelines and Encouragement

Authors that select video as their choice of presentation should submit an abstract as one would for the other presentation formats (see here). The abstract will be reviewed and if judged to be of sufficent quality, the authors will be invited to create and submit a video of their research. To ensure a high level of quality in video presentations suitable for viewing at a scientific conference, all video submissions will be reviewed, scored and a decision made on their quality prior to the start of the conference

 

How to Submit your Video

Please follow the steps below to successfully submit your video presentation. Video submissions must be received no later than 9th August 2017, 12 (noon) ADT**

  1. Upload your video to YouTube or Vimeo
  2. Once uploaded, please send the link to damian@marinemammalscience.org to let us know you have submitted your video
  3. If the video is password private or protected, please don't forget to include the password in the emai

Please note that if we do not receive your video link by the deadline of August 9th 2017, your submission will be changed to your choice of speed talk or poster.

If you have more questions, please email Damian Lidgard at damian@marinemammalscience.org

 

Scoring Rubric for Video Presentations

Each submission will be reviewed and scored by three reviewers who have experience in creating and editing video. Obviously, the video review process cannot be conducted blind but will strictly adhere to the scoring rubric provided below. After adjusting for differences in scoring among individual reviewers, videos will be ranked on the basis of their overall score. To be successful, submissions must achieve a 65% score or above in Section A and in Section B and score higher than ‘Insufficient’ in all categories. Video submissions that fail to achieve the score will be assigned a speed or poster talk. 

It is strongly recommended that video presenters follow the scoring rubric when creating their video. Submissions should be no more than 4 minutes in duration; videos of longer duration will not be accepted. Presenters are encouraged to use all forms of media (i.e., video, animation, narration, etc) to creatively express a structured storyline of their research including its purpose, the results and their meaning and implication. Footage and sound legitimately purchased may be used in the video. Primary authors are encouraged to present the work and provide the narration to create a link between the research and the researcher. The content should be presented in a manner that can be understood and appreciated not only by scientific peers but also by a wider audience. 

Review the scoring criteria for video presentations before submitting your video to ensure that you have covered all scoring elements.  

Section A: Content, Significance, Educational Value

Grade

Excellent

Good

Satisfactory

Insufficient

Points Awarded

3 points

2 points

1 points

0 points

 

Content and Objectives

The video offers a concise summary of the findings and highlights the key points of the study. The objectives of the study are clear and methods adequately described. Conclusions are supported by strong evidence.

The video offers an adequate summary of the findings and some of the highlights of the study. Majority of the study objectives and methods are given. There is adequate evidence to support the conclusions.

The video fails to adequately summarise the findings or highlights of the study. The objectives are not clear and methods are vague. Some conclusions lack supporting evidence.

The video does not summarise the findings or highlights of the study. The objectives are not given and methods are lacking. Many conclusions lack supporting evidence.

 

Significance

The video demonstrates the significance of the research to a wide audience.

The video adequately demonstrates the significance of the research to a wide audience.

The significance of the research to a wide audience is not clear.

The video fails to demonstrate the significance of the research.

 

Educational Value

The video has educational value to both the presenter’s peers and a wider, general audience.

The video offers some educational value to both the presenter’s peers and a wider, general audience.

The video offers moderate educational value to both the presenter’s peers and a wider, general audience.

The video offers no educational value.

 Section B: Structure, and Production and Creative Ability

Grade

Excellent

Good

Satisfactory

Insufficient

Points Awarded

3 points

2 points

1 points

0 points

 

Structure

The video has a clear beginning, middle and end that features an introduction, methods, results and conclusion and is easy to follow. The main findings and their relevance are expressed well.  

The video has some structure which features an introduction, methods, results and conclusion. The majority of findings and their relevance are given.

The video lacks structure with the appropriate sections ill-defined. Majority of findings and their relevance are not given.

The video has no structure or organisation. Findings and their relevance are not given.

 

Grammar and Terminology

English is grammatically correct. Scientific terms or acronyms are clearly defined.

Occasional incorrect English grammar used. Some of the scientific terms or acronyms are not adequately defined.

Inexcusable use of English grammar. Many of the scientific terms or acronyms are not adequately defined.

Very poor use of English grammar. Scientific terms or acronyms are not defined.

 

Narration

Clear, relaxed and comprehensible narration with a good pace and consistency in style. The speech is expressive and offers a cadence that encourages listening.

Mostly clear, relaxed and comprehensible narration, with a reasonable pace and mostly consistent style. The speech is adequately expressive.

Narration is mostly unclear, stressed, not very understandable, has a variable pace and is often inconsistent in style. The speech is not very expressive and the cadence deters listening.

Narration is unclear, stressed, incomprehensible, variable pace and is inconsistent in style throughout. The speech is not expressive.

 

Production and Editing

The story line is effectively expressed through video footage, sound, and special effects and is overall appealing. Scenes flow smoothly from one to the other without empty space.

The story line is expressed adequately through video footage, sound, and special effects and overall offers some appeal. The majority of scenes flow smoothly from one to the other and there is little empty space.

The story line lacks expression through inadequate use of video footage, sound, and special effects and overall offers little appeal. Many of the  scenes fail to flow smoothly from one to the other and there are many empty spaces.

The story line is hard to follow due to insufficient use of video footage, sound, and special effects and overall is confusing. There are many unnatural breaks between scenes and empty spaces.

 

Sound and Audio

Video footage and effects are improved through consistently high quality sound and audio, and together complement the storyline.

Video footage and effects are somewhat improved through mostly consistent, mostly high quality sound and audio.

Video footage and effects are hampered by inconsistent quality sound and audio, that together distract the viewer from the storyline.

The quality of the audio and sound are consistently poor and degrades the quality of the video footage and effects. The viewer is consistently distracted.

 

Graphics, Animation and Visuals

Graphics, animation and other visuals are effectively used to express the purpose and findings of the study and complement the audio.

Graphics, animation and other visuals are generally helpful for expressing the purpose and findings of the study and often complement the audio.

Graphics, animation and other visuals are generally unhelpful for expressing the purpose and findings of the study, and fail to complement the audio. 

Graphics, animation and other visuals are ineffectively used to express the purpose and findings of the study, add confusion and are more distracting than helpful.

 

Video Quality, Resolution and Camera Skill

The quality and resolution of the video are consistently high. Stills and video footage are in focus and effectively composed. The movement of the camera is smooth.

The quality and resolution of the majority of video is high. Stills and video footage are mostly in focus and well composed. Most of the movement of the camera is smooth.

The quality and resolution of the video are consistently low. Stills and video footage are often not in focus and ineffectively composed. The movement of the camera is often wobbly.

The quality and resolution of the video are inadequate for presentation. Stills and video footage are mostly not in focus and poorly composed. The movement of the camera is distracting.

Creative Expression

The visual and audio content of the video are creatively used to effectively express the purpose, findings and conclusions of the study.

For the most part, the visual and audio content of the video are creatively used to express the purpose, findings and conclusions of the study.

For the most part, the visual and audio content of the video are not creatively used, often distracting the viewer from the main messages of the study.

The visual and audio content of the video are not creatively used and fail to express the purpose, findings and conclusions of the study.

 

Examples of Video Presentations

As guidance, here are two examples of a video presentations:

"Whales in Fjords", is only 1:30 min duration and does not represent a full submission for SMM2017; however, it is a good example of how to be creative using different techniques and video footage to portray a research ideas. 

 

The second video, "Ocean Tracking Network: Tracking Seals Movement in our Oceans", is an example of the correct duration (4 mins) and shows the use of animation, field footage and other techniques to present a research study.

 

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